Farm Succession Advising: An Attorney Training Guide

Among beginning (and other) farmers’ biggest challenges is accessing land, including land and farms in the hands of older farmers. Therefore, how those farmers transition their farms to the next generation (family or unrelated) is of utmost importance. Land For Good’s Training Guide provides attorneys with solid legal background material and technical tools to use in assisting farmer clients to develop their farm succession plans.

Labeling Your Food Product

Small food businesses and farms with value-added processing often sell their products locally, but understanding the Food and Drug Administration’s rules for labeling those products can be challenging. This webinar will prepare you to feel confident creating a food label and selling your product.

Presenters: Rachel Gartner & Zac Maciejewski, Faegre, Drinker Biddle and Reath.

Selling Farm Products Through Online Food Hubs

In response to market changes, many local farmers have started selling their farm products directly to customers through local food hubs. Farm produce and local value-added products go right from the farmer, cook or baker to a delivery hub where orders are assembled and prepared for delivery or pick-up. Before you sell your products through a local food hub, you need to understand what may be required of you. This legal guide discusses:

• Pros and cons of participating in a food hub
• Vendor agreements with a local food hub

Running a Farmer Operated Food Hub

In response to market changes, many local farmers have started selling their farm products directly to customers through other farmers. Farm produce and local value-added products go right from the farmer, cook or baker to another farmer or business where orders are assembled and prepared for delivery or pick-up. This model is generally known as a food hub. If you are considering setting up a local food hub, this guide outlines the following legal considerations to keep in mind:

• Forming a separate entity
• Terms and conditions of agreements between farmers or vendors
• When a warehouse license must be obtained
• Collecting sales tax
• When a 1099-K must be issued

Home Delivery of Farm Products

Local farmers are adjusting their business operations to incorporate new ways of getting their products to customers and seizing the opportunity to add new marketing channels to their existing farm businesses. For many farmers, this shift has meant delivering products directly to the doors of their customers. If you are a farmer engaged or considering engaging in home delivery of farm products, this guide outlines some legal considerations to keep in mind.

Regulations and Insurance for CT Food Businesses

The Yale Law School Ludwig Center for Community & Economic Development provides legal services to clients to promote economic opportunity. The clinic has assisted affordable housing developers, community development financial institutions, farms and farmer’s markets, and many other clients to increase access to resources and break down economic barriers. Paul Healy is a second-year law student and member of the Clinic. His legal interests include startup financing and urban development. He also holds a master’s degree in Economics from Oxford University. Bessie Bauman is a third-year undergraduate and research assistant to the Clinic. Her legal interests include welfare law and urban development.

Regulations and Insurance for CT Food Businesses

The Yale Law School Ludwig Center for Community & Economic Development provides legal services to clients to promote economic opportunity. The clinic has assisted affordable housing developers, community development financial institutions, farms and farmer’s markets, and many other clients to increase access to resources and break down economic barriers. This powerpoint was developed by Paul Healy and Bessie Bauman. Paul Healy is a second-year law student and member of the Clinic. His legal interests include startup financing and urban development. He also holds a master’s degree in Economics from Oxford University. Bessie Bauman is a third-year undergraduate and research assistant to the Clinic. Her legal interests include welfare law and urban development.

FSMA Inspections: What Growers Need to Know

Sara Dewey and Mary Rose Scozzafava of the Conservation Law Foundation review the Food Safety Modernization Act Produce Safety Rule and what it will mean for Massachusetts farmers. Topics include: what is the produce safety rule, how does it relate to the Commonwealth Quality Program, and what inspections will look like for farmers in 2020.

Urban Agriculture in the City of Boston

Did you know that Boston has an ordinance that covers urban farming?  Article 89 is part of the Boston land zoning laws.  It covers urban agriculture activities in Boston such as farming, hydroponics and beekeeping and more.  The City of Boston prepared this guide to demystify the language of the actual rule.  After reading this guide, you will have a better understanding of:

  • the rules covering land use and permitting requirements
  • the permitted location and size of ground-level farms, roof-top farms and freight farms
  • soil safety guidelines for urban farming
  • keeping bees and chickens.

FAQs About the Produce Safety Rule

The Produce Safety Rule (PSR) imposes new requirements on farms to ensure the safety of produce consumed by humans. But New England farms tend to be small and to sell directly to consumers. Therefore, New England farms are more likely to be exempt from the Produce Safety Rule or eligible for a Qualified Exemption.  Qualified Exemption limits the obligations of a farm under the Produce Safety Rule. This Lightning Guide answers questions small farmers may have about the Produce Safety Rule.

Community Kitchens Legal Guide

Across New England, community kitchens are springing up to support food entrepreneurs, improve access to locally grown food, and support local farmers. This guide helps community kitchens and kitchen users – including small businesses and nonprofit groups – understand how to make use of these invaluable spaces and how to comply with the laws governing their operation.

Shared Use & Community Kitchens

Community kitchens can provide entrepreneurs and community groups a crucial link to building food businesses or running community food programs. This webinar shares some of the considerations for using shared community kitchen space legally, safely and successfully. The webinar includes an introduction to community use of kitchens, understanding the basics of what community and residential kitchens are and are not allowed to do, key legal considerations for community kitchens, and a case study of a successful food entrepreneur working who started in a shared kitchen.

This webinar was produced by Metropolitan Area Planning Council (MAPC) in partnership with Franklin Regional Council of Governments, Center for Health Law and Policy Innovation, Conservation Law Foundation, Massachusetts Association of Health Boards, Franklin County Community Development Corporation, and Whole Harmony.

FSMA Produce Safety Rule: Selected Topics

This webinar provides a useful overview of the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) Produce Safety Rule, presented by Rhode Island attorney Sumana Chintapalli and University of Rhode Island food safety expert Lori Pivarnik. It is a good starting point to become better acquainted with the Produce Safety Rule. The webinar includes an overview of the requirements under the rule, key definitions to know, activities covered under the rule, and how to determine if your farm is covered by the rule or exempt from it. It also reviews the requirements for agricultural water, biological soil amendments, domesticated and wild animals, and record keeping. Finally, it covers the timeline for compliance.