Maine Employment Rules for Agricultural Workers

Understanding the requirements of labor and employment law is essential in operating a successful farm business. Both Maine and federal law treat agricultural work differently than other forms of employment. Before hiring an employee, it is important to familiarize yourself with the relevant state and federal laws that govern the employer/employee relationship. This guide is intended to inform farm employers about the general requirements when hiring employees.

Lo básico de los impuestos sobre el salario

Las reglas que gobiernan los impuestos sobre el salario pueden ser complicadas. Los impuestos sobre el salario generalmente son calculados como un porcentaje del salario del empleado. Las fincas que emplean a trabajadores, deben retener dinero de los cheques de pago de sus empleados, emitir dichas cantidades retenidas a las autoridades de impuestos apropiadas, y declarar los impuestos sobre el salario a las agencias federales y estatales. Esta guía hace un esquema sobre qué son los impuestos sobre el salario y cómo y dónde pagarlos. Después de leer esta guía usted sabrá:

  • ¿qué son los impuestos sobre el salario y quién es responsable de los pagos?
  • las especificaciones de los diferentes tipos de impuestos sobre el salario
  • las exenciones especiales dadas a los empleados en agricultura

Employment Rules for Agricultural Workers in MA

Agricultural work is treated differently from other types of employment under the law; however, it is sometimes difficult to what qualifies as agricultural work.  This guide is intended to help Massachusetts farmers determine what is agricultural work, what is not, and why it matters.  You will learn:

  • What is Agricultural Work in Massachusetts
  • Minimum wage and overtime rules for agricultural employees
  • Minimum wage and overtime rules for regular employees

Co-Op Law 101

Co-ops are member owned entities that provide a solid foundation for farms and community members to collaboratively support the local food system. Attorney Dave Swanson of Dorsey & Whitney is going to provide a baseline knowledge of co-ops, including consumer co-ops and grower co-ops. He is also going to discuss what to consider when choosing a business structure and specifically the differences between non-profits and co-ops. With over 35 years of experience and Land O’Lakes and dozens of consumer coops as a clients, Dave is sure to provide a webinar filled with valuable information.

Legal Requirements for CT Food Businesses

Paul Healy and Bessie Bauman of The Yale Law School Ludwig Center for Community & Economic Development provide information on legal issues relevant to Connecticut food businesses.  This guide addresses:

  • Forming a business entity
  • Food licensing requirements
  • Employment and immigration rules
  • Tax filings

Employment Payroll Tax Basics

The rules governing payroll taxes can be complex. Payroll taxes are generally calculated as a percentage of the employee salary. Farms that employ workers must withhold money from their employees’ paychecks, timely submit withheld amounts to the appropriate tax authorities, and file payroll tax returns with state and federal agencies. This guide outlines what payroll taxes are, and how and when to pay them.  After reading this guide you will know:

  • what are payroll taxes and who is responsible for paying them
  • the different types of payroll taxes spec
  • the special exemptions given to agricultural employees

Rhode Island and Federal Leave Laws

Employment leave laws help balance employers’ needs for a reliable work force with employees’ responsibilities outside work. Leave laws also protect workers by allowing them to take time off without fear of losing their job.  Both Federal and Rhode Island state laws allow employees to take reasonable unpaid leave for family and medical reasons. Whether you are an employer or an employee, it is important to know your rights and obligations under these state and Federal laws. 

Interns, Apprentices and Volunteers-Rhode Island

Many people are curious about what happens at a farm and would be happy to volunteer a few hours of labor in return for the experience of farming.  Others would be willing to work as an unpaid intern in order to gain valuable knowledge and farm skills.  The prospect of free labor is appealing.  But is it legal? Do you understand the distinction between registered apprentices, paid and unpaid interns and volunteers?  This Legal Brief summarizes the legal requirements for these workers under Rhode Island law.